Winter walks in Bude

Posted by Paula Woodward in Cornwall, What to do,

As autumn turns to winter and the nights start to draw in, it can be very pleasant to get outside and enjoy some daylight and fresh air before hunkering down to enjoy our winter menu in our dining room. Here are some walks you could try.

Poundstock to Penfound – 3.2 miles

An easy country walk, although some stiles may be steep, this circular walk starts at Poundstock church, where you can also park. Follow the lanes through Treskinnick Cross, drop down into the valley at Newmill and then follow the side of the stream to Penfound Manor, said to be the oldest inhabited house in England before taking country lanes back to Poundstock. Time the walk right, and you could catch a film at the Rebel Cinema as you walk past.

Dunsdon to Vealand Farm – 4 miles

Taking around four hours, this is a pleasant walk for those with kids and dogs in tow. Explore the grassland meadows and wander along the waterway before finding the Vealand Farm nature reserve, full of ponds, hedges and meadows.

Kilkhampton to the Coombe Valley – 5 miles

One for the more adventurous walker, this is a relatively strenuous if slightly shorter walk, starting and finishing at Kilkhampton churchyard. The path is along the stream through Kilkhampton Common and then Stowe Woods. It can be slippery when wet but the woods in autumn and winter are full of beautiful colours and can be very uplifting.

Bude Canal – 6 miles

For a peaceful, gentle but moderately long walk, try walking the towpath of Britain’s most westerly canal. Originally created for transporting lime-rich sand to local farms, the canal is now used for canoes and kayaks rather than industrial shipping, although the sea lock does still work. The walk alongside Bude Canal is perfect for those who need wheels, such as prams and wheelchairs and a Tramper all-terrain mobility scooter is available for hire from Whalesborough Farm. 

Bude to Sandymouth – 6.2 miles

A moderate coastal walk, this walk can either be done out and back or by taking a slightly different route becomes a circular walk, starting at Bude Tourist Information Centre. The walk passes Bude Castle, Bude Sea Pool, the Surf Lifesaving Club and then takes the south-west coast path, passing Maer and Northcott Mouth (where the wreck of the SS Belem is exposed at low tide) and on to Sandymouth. The return route through Bude passes the infamous ‘Bude Tunnel’, a 230ft plastic tunnel from the road to Sainsbury’s Car Park, that was once voted Bude’s top tourist attraction on Tripadvisor.

Roughtor and Brown Willy – Bodmin Moor

Slightly further afield, but worth it to take in the glorious but exposed Bodmin Moor and the panoramic views of Cornwall from the top in good weather. Start at the Roughtor car park and then head up on to the moor. Expect a sharp climb as Brown Willy and Roughtor are the two highest points in Cornwall. For a shorter walk at 3 miles stop at the summit of Roughtor and then retrace your steps. To make the walk longer, continue on to Brown Willy. Look out for the stone circles and other remnants of ancient Neolithic civilization that are dotted across the moor. Be aware though that sheep, cattle and ponies graze on the open moor and that the weather can come in very fast, so be prepared with adequate clothing and footwear.